Month: April 2018

Trumpism at Columbia

A year ago, at the lunch honoring awardees of the Pulitzer Prize, Columbia President Lee Bollinger remarked that “the more bleak the world becomes—the less people seem to care about what is true and what is false.” By “people” he clearly meant President Trump and those who take his diatribes against the press in stride. Bollinger could safely assume that his audience of distinguished journalists would know which side he is on. Not only is he a renowned scholar and defender of free speech, but within days of Trump’s 2017 executive order restricting immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries, he...

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Speaking Ill of the Dead

I was dismayed to read Randa Jarrar’s tweet yesterday. Marking the death of Barbara Bush, she wrote that she was an “amazing racist who, along with her husband, raised a war criminal.” Later, she doubled-down, and claimed to be happy that “the witch is dead.” While I respect Jarrar’s honestly-held opinion, and I am appalled that she might face disciplinary action or dismissal for exercising her right to free speech, I found the sentiment tasteless, and deeply offensive. Worse still was the chorus of my comrades on the left who chimed-in with their own, often gleeful condemnations. Make no...

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From the Vaults: The Kinks’ ‘Come Dancing’

For reasons I don’t quite understand, I woke up with the Kinks’ ‘Come Dancing’ in my head yesterday.  It’s a catchy little ditty, but it really can’t hold weight versus the rest of the band’s oeuvre.  But it did introduce the band to a new generation of fans, and I was at the tail end of that generation when ‘Come Dancing’ shot up the pop charts in 1983.  I don’t think I’d heard the song in close to 20 or 25 years.  Listening to it yesterday, I was struck by how different the track is from the classic Kinks oeuvre.  It’s very much a 1980s song, driven by a horrible keyboard riff.  But it is also heavily influenced by ska and reggae, in the beat, and in the way Davies delivers the lyrics.  The horns that are meant to reflect the Big Band era sound more like they come from Specials, by design, of course. Anyway.  As I listened to the lyrics, I thought about how nostalgia works.  For those not familiar with the song, Ray Davies, the Kinks’ frontman, is singing about the new parking lot on the piece of land where the supermarket used to stand. Before that, they put up a bowling alley, on the site that used to be the local palais.  You see, as Ray was growing up in the 40s and 50s, his...

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Unlicensed Driver by Lylanne Musselman

Installment 19 reminds us that the topside of terror is often desire. Lylanne Musselman’s unlicensed driver violates the laws of the road, family, and gender. Evading the fear and self-doubt that our culture expects from teenage girls, she hazards the routes of adulthood with refreshing resolve.  *** Unlicensed Driver My first memory of driving was around 15 – I was waitressing at my uncle’s restaurant. Mom, dad, my aunt and uncle had gone home early for an adult party later that evening. My two younger cousins assigned to stay with me, were to be brought home by our designated...

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